A literary analysis of the chapters in animal farm

Jones creates a power vacuum, and it is only so long before the next oppressor assumes totalitarian control. Jones, the owner of Manor Farm, falls asleep in a drunken stupor, all of his animals meet in the big barn at the request of old Majora year-old pig.

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Communism, he thought, was inherently hypocritical. The pigs and dogs take most of the power for themselves, thinking that they are the best administrators of government.

He then teaches the animals a song — "Beasts of England" — which they sing repeatedly until they awaken Jones, who fires his gun from his bedroom window, thinking there is a fox in the yard.

The Societal Tendency Toward Class Stratification Animal Farm offers commentary on the development of class tyranny and the human tendency to maintain and reestablish class structures even in societies that allegedly stand for total equality.

Thanks in part to Animal Farm, much of the Western world finally realized the danger of communism. Frightened by the shot, the animals disperse and go to sleep. Though he agreed with many Marxist principles, Orwell was unable to accept the communist interpretation of socialism because he saw many similarities between the communist governments and the previous czarist regimes in old Russia.

His novella creates its most powerful ironies in the moments in which Orwell depicts the corruption of Animalist ideals by those in power. All of these characteristics become more pronounced as the novel proceeds. Continued on next page As a result, the other animals seem unable to oppose the pigs without also opposing the ideals of the Rebellion.

In Animal Farm, the pigs gradually twist and distort a rhetoric of socialist revolution to justify their behavior and to keep the other animals in the dark. Jones, for example, is presented as a drunken, careless ruler, whose drinking belies the upscale impression he hopes to create with the name of his farm.

Eventually the power corrupts them, and they turn on their fellow animals, eliminating competitors through propaganda and bloodshed. The struggle for preeminence between Leon Trotsky and Stalin emerges in the rivalry between the pigs Snowball and Napoleon.

In the novella, the overthrow of the human oppressor Mr. Although Orwell believed strongly in socialist ideals, he felt that the Soviet Union realized these ideals in a terribly perverse form.

The novella illustrates how classes that are initially unified in the face of a common enemy, as the animals are against the humans, may become internally divided when that enemy is eliminated.

The expulsion of Mr. In both the historical and fictional cases, the idealistic but politically less powerful figure Trotsky and Snowball is expelled from the revolutionary state by the malicious and violent usurper of power Stalin and Napoleon.

This is of course a reference to Stalin, who murdered many of his own people in order to maintain his dictatorship of Russia. In either case, the novella points to the force of this tendency toward class stratification in many communities and the threat that it poses to democracy and freedom.

In his self-proclaimed "fairy-story," Orwell uses his allegorical farm to symbolize the communist system.

By addressing his audience as "comrades" and prefacing his remarks with the statement that he will not be with the others "many months longer," Major ingratiates himself to his listeners as one who has reached a degree of wisdom in his long life of twelve years and who views the other animals as equals — not a misguided rabble that needs advice and correction from a superior intellect.

Animal Farm: Theme Analysis

This notion that "All Animals Are Equal" becomes one of the tenets of Animalism, the philosophy upon which the rebellion will supposedly be based. Orwell intended to criticize the communist regime he saw sweeping through Russia and spreading to Europe and even the United States.

Major delivers a rousing political speech about the evils inflicted upon them by their human keepers and their need to rebel against the tyranny of Man. The animals assembling in the barn are likewise characterized by Orwell in quick fashion: Indeed, the first chapter presents Jones as more of an "animal" than the animals themselves, who reacts to any disruption of his comfort with the threat of violence, as indicated by his gunfire when he is awakened from his drunken dreams.

Retelling the story of the emergence and development of Soviet communism in the form of an animal fable, Animal Farm allegorizes the rise to power of the dictator Joseph Stalin. Major is old and wise, Clover is motherly and sympathetic, Boxer is strong yet dimwitted, Benjamin is pessimistic and cynical, and Mollie is vain and childish.

Animal Farm

Jones by a democratic coalition of animals quickly gives way to the consolidation of power among the pigs. Much like the Soviet intelligentsia, the pigs establish themselves as the ruling class in the new society.

For Animal Farm serves not so much to condemn tyranny or despotism as to indict the horrifying hypocrisy of tyrannies that base themselves on, and owe their initial power to, ideologies of liberation and equality.

After elaborating on the various ways that Man has exploited and harmed the animals, Major mentions a strange dream of his in which he saw a vision of the earth without humans.

Rather, the story is told from the perspective of the common animals as a whole. The purges and show trials with which Stalin eliminated his enemies and solidified his political base find expression in Animal Farm as the false confessions and executions of animals whom Napoleon distrusts following the collapse of the windmill.

Though the original intention of overthrowing Mr. In the end, America would prove that capitalism and democracy could outlive a system of government-mandated equality.Animal Farm is filled with songs, poems, and slogans, including Major’s stirring “Beasts of England,” Minimus’s ode to Napoleon, the sheep’s chants, and Minimus’s revised anthem, “Animal Farm, Animal Farm.” All of these songs serve as propaganda, one of the major conduits of social control.

A summary of Themes in George Orwell's Animal Farm. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Animal Farm and what it means.

How to Write Literary Analysis; Suggested Essay Topics; Sample A+ Essay; How to Cite This SparkNote Retelling the story of the emergence and development of Soviet. Animal Farm Literary Analysis & Devices Chapter Exam Instructions Choose your answers to the questions and click 'Next' to see the next set of questions.

You can skip questions if you would like and come back to them later with the yellow "Go To First Skipped Question" button. Animal Farm: Theme Analysis, Free Study Guides and book notes including comprehensive chapter analysis, complete summary analysis, author biography information, character profiles, theme analysis, metaphor analysis, and top ten quotes on classic literature.

After Mr. Jones, the owner of Manor Farm, falls asleep in a drunken stupor, all of his animals meet in the big barn at the request of old Major, a year-old pig. Major delivers a rousing political speech about the evils inflicted upon them by their human keepers and their need to rebel against the tyranny of Man.

Animal Farm is an allegory for what happened in Russia between the years of about and Some of the latest editions of the book leave this fact out, likely hoping to make it a more "univer.

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A literary analysis of the chapters in animal farm
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