A report on scales of justice a miniseries by michael jenkins

He joined the force with an idealistic belief in law and order and now he finds himself deeply compromised in a sordid theft while at the same time not wanting to dob in a work mate. It was also one of the first Australian miniseries to depict contemporary Australian society at a time when historical themes predominated.

It highlighted connections between members of the police force and organised crime figures some 10 years before the Royal Commission into Corruption in the NSW Police Force began. He returns to the street where the police car is parked, to find his patrol partner, a Senior Sergeant Bill Hunterhiding a fur coat in the boot.

The performances are nuanced and extraordinarily real.

The Royal Commission revealed that there were police officers at various levels who abused police powers and were involved in taking bribes, fabricating and planting evidence, drug dealing and in the cover-up of paedophile rings.

In a dramatic way the clip reveals how an idealistic and honest young policeman may be drawn into collusion with the corrupt practices of his colleagues.

This is television drama at its very best, and after two decades, this series has not lost its bite. The police corruption depicted in Scales of Justice had strong parallels with the culture that existed in the NSW Police Force in the s, and the audience was quick to identify the actual people being depicted.

Webber is left to stand guard at the shop until the detectives arrive. And at the upper levels of policing, there are huge sums to be made from importing and dealing in drugs, not to mention the seduction of rubbing shoulders with well-heeled crims with the venality and naked ambition of the politicians they are sworn to serve.

Through their work, Australian filmmakers and investigative journalists have prompted a number of Royal Commissions and reforms. The research for the scripts of Scales of Justice included actual interviews with police officers and with criminals, and while the series was presented as a fictionalised account, it revealed aspects of corruption in the police force and implicated politicians in ways that mirrored reality.

Educational value points Scales of Justice was regarded as a groundbreaking television program when it was broadcast in the s because it focused on corruption within the New South Wales Police Force.

Back at the station, the rookie Constable finds the fur hanging in his locker.Talk:Scales of Justice (miniseries) Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects: WikiProject Film. Scales of Justice | Home.

Talk:Scales of Justice (miniseries)

Scales of Justice: episode guide. Act 1 | Act 2 | 3. Act One — The Job. Written by Robert Caswell Produced by Michael Carson Directed by Michael Jenkins Starring: Simon Burke as Constable Webber; John Hargreaves as Constable Borland; Bill Hunter as Sergeant O'Rourke Telemovies & miniseries In production.

Apr 11,  · Scales of Justice is a three-part Australian drama miniseries, made in by director Michael Jenkins. It was one of the most controversial Australian mini. Scales of Justice is a three-part Australian drama miniseries, made in by director Michael Jenkins.

It was one of the most controversial Australian mini-series ever produced, examining corruption in all levels of law killarney10mile.comn by: Robert Caswell.

Scales of Justice is a three-part Australian drama miniseries, made in by director Michael Jenkins. It was one of the most controversial Australian mini-series ever produced, examining corruption in all levels of law enforcement.

Michael Jenkins, the director of Scales of Justice, has a broad filmography encompassing a range of popular productions for both film and television.

Jenkins directed the ABC series Blue Murder, based around stories.

Download
A report on scales of justice a miniseries by michael jenkins
Rated 5/5 based on 91 review